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Doll Washing
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Type: Projects   Skills: Health & SafetyPlay & CreativitySocial & Emotional Skills
In this activity, youíll learn how an activity like washing dolls can help your child release tension and express their feelings in a healthy way. Doll Washing
What We Learn
Kids can learn a lot from a simple activity like washing dolls. By role-playing, your kids are making sense of the world by re-enacting what they see their parents do, which promotes healthy development. Taking care of the doll allows your child the freedom of self-expression, which encourages him or her to open up to you more. Finally, washing dolls helps relax your childís mind and body. Itís a soothing, low-stress activity that the child can relate to his or her own bath time.
Supply List
Plastic baby doll
Plastic bin or tub
Soap
Baby shampoo
Washcloth
Towel
Comb or brush
How-To
For each child in your care, fill a plastic bin or tub about halfway with warm water. You may want to first lay down a drop cloth in case any of the water gets splashed around.

Make available for each child a washcloth, soap, baby shampoo, and a towel and show them how they can begin bathing their plastic dolls.

If you donít have a plastic doll, or if the child prefers another toy, feel free to substitute a different toy for the child to wash. For instance, the child may prefer to wash a plastic dinosaur or horse instead. Just make sure the toy is suitable for getting wet!

When the children are done washing their doll, they can dry the doll off with the towel youíve provided. They can start combing or brushing the dollís hair.

Children will find this activity to be a calm and soothing experience. Kids can work at their own pace, even incorporate bath toys to mimic their own bathing experience.

During the activity, parents or providers should ask open-ended questions, such as ďWhatís your favorite toy to add to the bath?Ē It also engages the parent to teach the child ways of giving your child positive direction in a soothing way, if the childís splashing gets out of hand. The activity can also be a bonding time for parent and child. Although the child may not open up immediately, the child may become more open afterwards, as he or she will relate this bonding experience as safe ground.
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